Creating Web Video That’ll Work for Your Business

It’s no secret anyone can create & upload web video to their site, Youtube or other sites easily, but that doesn’t mean it’s a good idea. Here are 3 key points to consider to help keep your videos fresh, interesting and effective followed by a great discussion by some of the pros on creating videos for business.

  1. Don’t ONLY create videos to increase your chances of being found. Have specific business objectives (a strategy) in addition to SEO such as:
    • Improve your customer service by posting how to videos.
    • Added value to current clients with “tips” videos.
    • Go viral – worth mentioning because, while getting millions of views on Youtube is possible, it’s really a practical goal.
  2. Stay on brand. “Premiere” products will want to pay special attention to quality and serious brand will have to avoid silly or tacky subjects.
  3. How many can you make? Creating videos takes time! Try to create a system where you shoot a couple at once so you can post them over time or get into the habit of shooting quick videos throughout your week. This will help you keep your content fresh and new!

Check out this podcast! Starting at 45min 15seconds begins a great discussion of how different businesses can use video. Thi is also a great  example of the discussion every business owner should be having before they start producing videos for their business!

this WEEK in MEDIA 133 : Tales from Twitter
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 1:46 AM
What if your Iphone drove your car, what to do if people hate you online, and when all else fails put pets in your video!

TWIM (This Week In Media) is a podcast that focuses on the present and future of web video from tv shows, to movies and even how businesses are using web video for self promotion.

Already posting videos for your business? Share them in the comments! Maybe they’ll make it into our next Cheap & Easy Web Video You Can Do Too!

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*Flickr Image by SV – Sosialistisk Venstreparti

Good luck!

@richardbouchez

>>NEW!! CHECK OUT SOCIAL MEDIA PROFILE BUSINESS CARDS>>>

 

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How can we help you?

Inovedia Marketing provides the following services, how can we help you?

Social Media Marketing

  • We provide training, monitoring, blogging & copy writing services which means we can just get you started or manage and build your social networking efforts!

Multimedia Production

  • Let us create your web videos! We have Emmy award winning talent and the know how to create high quality videos & podcasts on a budget. For bigger projects, our access and established relationships with full service facilities means the sky is the limit!

Web Design & New Media Development

  • Put the web to work for you! From tweaks to complete redesigns, we’ll transform your website into an engaging resource your ideal customers will frequent! Ask how we can deliver highly target-able audiences to your door through new media product development! We can extend your brand, drive traffic and multiply your reach!

General Creative Services

  • Copy-writing, design services, online and traditional marketing campaign development, contest creation & management. Ad creation including banner ads, print, radio, television, newspaper and direct mail.

Email: InovediaMarketing at gmail dot com

Twitter: @inovedia

 

Richard Bouchez is a certified Inbound Marketing professional specializing in Social Media Marketing & New Media content development. Richard’s web, audio & video work has been honored with Emmy, Promax & CBA awards.

Create the “Where the Hell Did You Get That Idea” Ad

It’s fairly common to see an ad that has absolutely nothing to do with the product it’s supposed to be selling. Often referred to as “concept creative” or “high concept advertising” ads of this nature can fail miserably in two ways: an ad leaves the wrong impression about the product (such as a silly ad for a serious product) or the product is lost in the creativity of the ad. So why am I about to suggest you try it? Because when done right the results can be amazing and the process is a blast!

Sound like it’s over your head? It’s not and you can apply this technique to video, print, radio, or whatever! Here are a couple of great examples from the Google Mobile Blog:


These videos aren’t just memorable and entertaining; they also showcase new and different ways of looking at these gadgets, which is exactly how Google wants you to associate their mobile efforts. You can find more Google videos like this here: http://www.youtube.com/user/MobileTrix

Here’s a memorable way we showcased the slogan, “Accurate, Balanced, To the Point,” for a holiday promo:

Ok, here are some tips just to get you started:

  • First narrow down what you are selling. Notice the Google videos focus just on phones in simple surroundings and the holiday promo focuses on just 3 words. The simpler you make it, the more memorable the ad will be and the more your product will stand out.
  • Start with a long list of common metaphors, comparisons and relationships that are easily relatable to your product, but preferably not in the literal sense. For example a fire truck is obviously related to hot sauce. Keep it simple, make sure it’s obvious.

Once you’ve gotten to this point, you just need to avoid a couple pitfalls:

  • Pick an overall theme that’s appropriate for your product or brand. In other words, don’t get goofy with a serious product or try to shock the audience when selling a conservative product.
  • Be aware of your target audience’s age and make sure you’re age appropriate.

Test your concept! The best way to find out if you’re idea is “on target” is by rounding up potential customers and asking them, not by asking your immediate family and friends. I also highly recommend posting your ideas as discussions in LinkedIN groups and asking for feedback from peers & marketers.

Want a non-video example? Here’s an entire website built using “being in the doghouse” to connect to potential customers. Women can put their guy “in the doghouse” and suggest gifts that will get them out of the doghouse. Check it out at: http://bewareofthedoghouse.com

Here’s one of my all time favorite ads:

In this clever ad, a fight breaks out between the bear and a guy over salmon… you may ask yourself what does that have to do with John West brand and the answer is “it’s so good you do anything to get it” – a good reinforcement of their message.

At the end of the day only one thing matters and it’s the answer to this question: Did the audience remember your product?

Good luck!

If you are interested in clever ads I highly recommend visiting NowThatsaCoolIdea blog where I ran across the Doghouse website.

-Richard (@richardbouchez)

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Just “HOW TO” Examples You Can Do Too! (More Than Video)

Every website can benefit from a “How to” demonstration whether its created with video, photographs, an article, a power point presentation or an animation, simple or elaborate. Even the most basic demonstration can make a big difference.

Where should you start? What “how to” should you do?

Ultimately these questions should be answered by your customers, so ask them! Start with a list of your services and related topics your customers may be interested in and be sure to included other random ideas – anything goes! The idea here is to educate, entertain or somehow engage visitors with useful content. You don’t need to go all out with an elaborate video, a couple of photos accompanied by short explanations can work extremely well just ask Ikea!

Keep it "Ikea Simple" click to enlarge
Keep it "Ikea Simple" click to enlarge

Here’s an example using a simple list and photo layout and they’ve even included a video at the bottom of the page. “How to Make Cous Cous”

Simple descriptions & photos work well!
Simple descriptions & photos work! click to visit site

If you want to create a video, for your first one, narrow it down to only topics you’re extremely knowledgeable of that can be performed in a quiet, well lit area. Here’s a link to a great example of a video shot very close up, in one take. “How to Tie a Tie”

*Please note, these videos and photos are well lit and shot very close to subject of the video. Instructions should be clear and to the point. Keep in mind that with web video your audience is watching a pretty small screen, they’ll want to see what you’re showing them!

I’m not suggesting you do anything that will cause you to lose business or give away your family secrets, but the chances are that even if you did give away your award winning recipe noone could replicate it anyway! That being said, try to showcase your expertise and give useful information.

As a final suggestion, look for opportunities to link to existing demonstrations. For example: to enhance InovediaMarketing.com as a small business resource we use “Delicious” to bookmark useful “New Marketing” articles. You can learn about using delicious from this very creative video:

Here are some other sites you can peruse for “how to” examples:

-Richard

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Cheap & Easy Web Video You Can Do Too!


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Creating videos for your website does not have to be a big expensive production in order to make a big impact on your visitors. From “How to” to “Viral Videos” here are examples that can be created “on the cheap” with little gear, no professional help and still manage to effectively get the point across.

HOW TO (Demonstration):

  • This video is a great example of what to do and what not to do! While the quality of this video is underwhelming, to say the least, the content is solid. The big take away for you: make sure there’s enough light! Before you watch this, keep in mind that this video has been seen almost 400,000 times in about 2 years. That’s right, four hundred thousand times. Just imagine if you were a piano reseller or teacher and your name was prominent throughout!
  • Have you ever watched someone make a paper airplane? You don’t get much more basic than this! What’s great about this video is that you can clearly see everything that’s happening and, anyone who wanted to, could easily follow along using the pause/play buttons to create create their own paper airplane. Is there something you do that can be showcased like this? This video has been seen over 1.5 million times!

A Unique Glimpse at What You Do:

  • Here is a fun way you may be able to highlight services you provide on your website, it may take some minor editing but the results are well worth it!

THE PERSONAL APPROACH:

  • This video is from Girl Arsonist, an “independent novelist,” who is trying to connect with her fans, build her audience and sell some books.

VIRAL VIDEOS:

  • These are videos intended to create buzz and drive views to your site. They are often very subtle and sometimes don’t even mention the products / services / company that created them, which I generally do not recommend. Here is a viral video example I created, using basic editing software, as an Olympic tie-in.

  • This is pretty amazing and kind of mesmerizing.
  • The final video is an amazingly successful viral video project by Blendtec. It is clever, hugely popular and “on brand.” The Will it Blend video is obviously of high quality and production but could certainly be done “on the cheap.”

For an extensive list of sites where you can find many different examples I highly recommend visiting this very thorough post: 37 Essential Viral Video Tips, Posts and Sites

For tips and advice on purchasing & using consumer video equipment I highly recommend Scott Bourne’s http://www.ConsumerVideoTips.com. Scott provides straight forward advice on a wide range of products.

Good luck!

@richardbouchez

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Video Tips: “How to” and Demonstrational Videos

Whether you are going to pick up a camera yourself or put the camera in someone else’s hands, professional or amateur, here are some tips to help you keep your message front and center.

  • Narrow your focus. Don’t talk about all of your services in one video; create many videos that each demonstrates one service. More choices = more inviting.
  • Have a plan! Try your best to script and map out everything. To get a more natural performance in a longer video, I suggest using discussion points instead of cue cards that have the whole script written out word for word. Shorter projects should be memorized whenever possible because it’s both obvious and distracting when someone is reading directly off cue cards.
  • Schedule extra time! You’ll be surprised at how quickly time flies, if you have plenty you won’t have to worry about how many takes… it takes. You may even be able to accommodate new ideas that strike you in the moment. The less rushed, the more natural the performance and the more you have to repeat lines, the more comfortable they’ll be read.
  • Do a trial run! Television shows often shoot pilot episodes, you should too. This will reveal obstacles and give you a good idea of how much time and resources your project will actually take. You may find yourself scaling back or gearing up to ensure success!
  • Keep it simple! Keep the area that will be on camera clutter free, well lit and reasonably quiet if possible. Be sure that everything shown on camera actually needs to be there. Conditions will vary greatly from project to project but think about this… Lighting can take a project from good to great, clutter can kill your message and background sounds can be added later, where adding dialog later may be much more difficult.
  • Shoot tight. Make sure everything you’re showing and demonstrating is clearly visible. If you’re showing me how to roll sushi, tighten in on the working area… in this scenario, if your face is on camera the shot is probably too wide for me to really see the demonstration. Web videos are often small when viewed and because the quality is fairly low you need to make sure viewers can see what you’re showing.
  • Virtually every video camera has an input for headphones. Get an inexpensive pair of “over the ear” headphones. Make sure the videographer is wearing the headphones during the shoot. This is the best way to identify audio problems allowing you to reshoot if need be.
  • Keep segments short! Break up videos into multiple parts making sure individual segments can “stand alone” then also upload the entire video as a single clip (if possible), this will give the user the choice that works best for them. Clearly mark each video with details such as “Large file” or “Part 1, length 3 minutes” so viewers know exactly what to expect.
  • If there is editing involved, keep transitions and other effects to a minimum. A good transition is one you don’t notice.
  • If someone else shoots the video for you, professional or amateur, make sure you will receive all of the footage. Be sure to include this requirement in your upfront negotiations. There may come a time when you need that footage, you could be in a bind if videographer is unavailable.

Remember, video projects can be as complicated as you make them. If you focus on keeping your message clear and concise, you should have a winner every time. This is in no way meant to be a comprehensive list, just general tips on producing better “how to” videos for the web for folks who have little or no experience putting together projects like these. Please share this article by clicking the + button below my name.

-Richard

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Web Video: Choosing a Videographer

A question posted on http://www.Linkedin.com inspired this article:How much does it cost to shoot a video for our own website?”

Unfortunately, there is no simple answer to this question due to the many variables in any given video project. Without more specifics, we may speculate about other costs costs beyond the videographer such as equipment rental, lighting, locations (if permits are involved), and extra help such as gaffers or grips if it’s a particularly high-end project.

Here are some guidelines, assuming this is a relatively low budget production involving one camera in a location which you have full access at no cost to you:

  • The key here is your plan, the better and more specific your plan the more cost effective your project will be – guaranteed! A well thought out plan can yield great advice from a seasoned videographer or set expectations from an inexperienced one.
  • The best way to shop videographers is via referral, there is no better way! The second best option is to use a combination of demo reel search and phone interview. It is important to view demo reels and look for your projects potential in the reel as there is a good chance you’ll run across someone who specializes in a technique that could take your project into “the next level.”
  • There is no “set price” for a shooter and even hiring the best doesn’t guarantee results. You may, in fact, be better off with an inexperienced “rising star” who will put every ounce of energy into getting you an amazing product because they need the work for their demo reel.
  • Negotiate! Occasionally you can find a shooter who will cut you a deal if they need the work and more often than not you can negotiate a half day rate.
  • If you’re shooting video, you’re going to need it edited… my suggestion is to get the best videographer possible. While you’ll probably have to pay the videographer by the day, you should be able to find an editor you can pay by the project. This will insure you have their attention until your project is completed to your standards.
  • I always recommend using an experienced videographer, but that doesn’t mean they have to use their equipment (which they will charge you for by the day). You could save big money on equipment, especially over a couple of days, for example, web projects do not require high end video cameras and an experienced videographer could get you great looking video, which could literally save you a couple of hundred bucks per day!
  • My final advice: overshoot, overshoot, overshoot! Consider future projects you where you may use the video you’re shooting and shoot extra elements now. You’ll be surprised at how much better future project will look and how difficult it will be to recreate elements found in your original video, no matter how good your team, lighting is unbelievably difficult to match.

This article was not meant to be an all inclusive answer, but advice and tips on getting you started. It is a part of series intended to help small business owners improve their marketing efforts utilizing the web, social marketing and other online tools. My portfolio is available at www.RABpromo.com, and I will gladly recommend videographers or producers in your area if I know of any. I am available for consulting, producing and multimedia project management.

-Richard

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